Massachusetts Innovation News & Events

Investor Capitalists in Boston

Venture Capital Boston Massachusetts

Start-up Axio, IDEO put heads together

By Scott Kirsner |  GLOBE CORRESPONDENT

david skok

MATRIX PARTNERS - David Skok – A top go-to investor

Highlights from Scott Kirsner’s Innovation Economy blog.

One of the cooler start-ups in Cambridge right now is Axio, which is developing a headband that could improve your ability to focus on work, studying, or an athletic endeavor.

I wrote about the company back in February, and since then, Axio has participated in two “accelerator” programs: Haxlr8r, which involved spending 15 weeks in Shenzhen, China, and Highland Capital Partners’ Summer@Highland program for collegiate entrepreneurs, based in Kendall Square.

Now Axio will be the first “start-up in residence” at the Central Square offices of IDEO, the renowned design firm.

“Axio is doing really cool stuff with sensors and playing across the hardware and software boundary,” says Colin Raney, IDEO’s location director in Cambridge.

“We think there’s a great opportunity to learn from each other.”

Axio’s headband uses three sensors that touch the wearer’s forehead to measure brain activity, and transmit the data via Bluetooth to a PC or mobile device. Software on the device helps guide the wearer to a state of intense focus. Cofounder Arye Barnehama has said the company is aiming for a price of about $100.

As for whether IDEO will open its Cambridge office to other fledgling businesses in the future, Raney says, “We’re definitely interested . . . but fit is critical.

For us, this is about learning, finding inspiration, and playing in new spaces.”

Boston’s go-to investors

Venture Capital Boston Massachusetts

When an entrepreneur in Boston has a new idea, which investors see it first?

I surveyed 91 entrepreneurs this month to create a list of the “go to” venture capitalists in Boston in five different categories. It was easy to determine the top dogs in software and the Web but harder in life sciences or semiconductors. My question was simple: “Who is the first VC in Boston/New England you’d pitch?”

I asked people to weigh in only on fields where they’d had experience: social, mobile, consumer Web, and games; enterprise-oriented software, services, software-as-a-service; life sciences, health care, and medical device; cleantech, energy, sustainability, LEDs, and batteries; semiconductors, telecom, materials, robotics, and other “hard” technologies that don’t fit into the cleantech category.

Top vote-getters in the first two categories each received more than a dozen votes, while the other winners rarely received more than three; I received fewer responses from entrepreneurs in life sciences and cleantech, and there were a greater number of investors receiving votes in these categories, especially in life sciences, where 45 respondents gave votes to 23 different VCs.

■ Social media, consumer Web, mobile and games (62 responses):

Go-to investor: Bijan Sabet, Spark Capital

Runner-up: Eric Paley, Founder Collective

Go-to firm: Spark Capital

■ Enterprise-oriented software, services, and SaaS (57 responses):

Go-to investor: David Skok, Matrix Partners

Runner-up: Izhar Armony, Charles River Ventures

Go-to firm: Matrix Partners

■ Life sciences, health care, and medical devices (45 responses):

Go-to investor: Michael Greeley, Flybridge Capital Partners

Runner-up: Bruce Booth, Atlas Venture

Go-to firm: Polaris Venture Partners

■ Cleantech, energy, and sustainability (32 responses):

Go-to investor: Matt Nordan, Venrock

Runner-up: Bilal Zuberi, General Catalyst

Go-to firm: North Bridge Venture Partners

■ Semiconductors, telecom, materials, and robotics (32 responses):

Go-to investor: David Aronoff, Flybridge Capital Partners

Runner-up: No clear runner-up

Go-to firm: Matrix Partners

Note: Antonio Rodriguez of Matrix Partners joined the firm in 2010, and his lack of a long track record may be why he received votes in three different categories: social, enterprise, and semiconductors.

His voted totaled 7.25, making him the third-highest after Skok and Sabet.

And Aronoff at Flybridge moved to New York over the summer to help expand the firm’s office there, so he may not really be accurately defined as a Boston VC going forward.

For the full Innovation Economy blog, updated daily, visit www.boston.com/innovation.

Entrepreneurial Mindset

Entrepreneur Richard Branson

The Entrepreneurial Mindset – How to Think Like a Successful Entrepreneur

Article Courtesy of:  ENTREPRENEURSPRO

Entrepreneur Richard Branson

Entrepreneur Richard Branson

The entrepreneurial mindset is what sets successful people in business.

Without the entrepreneurial mindset at work, you may find it hard to achieve success in any kind of business.

True entrepreneurs seem to have certain qualities that enable them to be successful in what they do. It has to do a lot with how they think and how they look at things.

The way you think can really determine whether you will become a successful entrepreneur or not.

Through the years, experts have studied and observed how the entrepreneurial mindset works and this is what they were able to discover:

1. Successful entrepreneurs think that they can do it.

Armed with a vision of what they want to achieve, entrepreneurs have absolute confidence in themselves that they will be able to succeed.

They look at things in a different way.

When other people think of the obstacles along the way, entrepreneurs think of them as challenges.

A strong belief, coupled with positive thinking, is just one of the marks of a successful entrepreneur.

2. Successful entrepreneurs think that risk is all part of the process.

Most people are afraid of risks because they do not want to find themselves outside of their safety zone. Successful entrepreneurs think otherwise.

Sometimes you need to come out of the safety zone and take risks in order to succeed.

But winning entrepreneurs have another trait going for them – they know how to take calculated risks.

3. Successful entrepreneurs not only “think”, they “do.”

They know that in order to be successful, action is needed.

Having well-intentioned goals is good, but focused action would get you there.

Having the entrepreneurial mindset will help a lot in making you succeed with your next business endeavor.

Developing it takes some time.

But the earlier you take the effort of doing so, the better your chances of succeeding as an entrepreneur.